F220 Mid-Tine Tiller

F220 Mid-Tine Tiller

Looking for a tiller that can do it all? Honda’s F220 is a mid-tine model that can be set up for two tilling widths, has an engine that can handle tough soil better than compact two strokes, and uses a drive system to take the strain off the tines and the operator.

Power

This model uses Honda’s GXV57 engine. While it may be small, it shares the same basic design as Honda’s larger commercial engines. This includes features like an automotive-style paper air filter that provides better protection and needs less frequent maintenance than foam filters. Small displacement motors don’t need much force to turn over to begin with, and with this engine’s automatic decompression system, the starter pull is as light as a feather.

Honda has led the way toward the switch from two to four-stroke engines to meet tightening emissions regulations. This switch doesn’t just help the environment, it also brings major improvements to usability. There’s no need to mix oil with fuel, and the engine is far less sensitive to fuel degradation. The GXV57’s wide torque curve keeps it from stalling when the tines run into compacted dirt, and if it does stall, it’s much easier to start. Honda fits the tiller with a steel bar that wraps around the engine, protecting it from impacts during operation and transport.

Tilling

This model has a maximum tilling width of 21 inches. If you need to work around borders or small plots, the outer tines can be removed, reducing the width to 12 inches. At full throttle, the tines spin at 138 RPM.

The mid-tine design places the engine weight directly over the tines, helping push them into the soil. That’s 58 lbs. of force that doesn’t have to be exerted by the operator.
The engine has an integrated transmission with one forward speed. Since it doesn’t have to rely on the tines for momentum, they can do more cutting, giving this small tiller the power to slice through clay and compacted soil.
Honda offers optional side discs that deflect dirt away from plants and pavement for easy cleanup, while the furrow attachment makes a V-shaped trench for planting.

Operation

The handle on the F220 can be set to three positions, giving the operator a comfortable hand position with the right amount of leverage. A front-mounted retractable transport wheel flips up and down with minimal effort. When the wheel is down, the handles can be lifted to roll the tiller around the yard.

Once the tiller is in the work area, the depth bar can be adjusted to limit how deep the tines dig. This creates consistent planting beds, even when the tiller is moved between gardening plots. After the work is done, the handle can be folded forward, making the overall package compact for easy storage and transport.

Warranty

This tiller and its engine are covered for two years of residential use or one year of commercial or rental use.

Getting Parts and Accessories for the F220 Tiller

Hondalawnparts.com is more than an online parts warehouse: we’re a certified dealer for Honda Power Equipment and Honda Engines so you can be sure you’ll always get quality OEM replacements for your tiller. Our site can search by your model and serial number and will show you factory parts diagrams and parts descriptions so you can be sure you’re ordering exactly what you need. We can ship your order to any address in the U.S. or Canada.

FC600 Mid-Tine Tiller

FC600 Mid-Tine Tiller

Most tiller models are built for very light work with minimal power and features, or for turning large areas into seed beds for gardening. If you need something that can do both, the Honda FC600 may be what you’re looking for. It’s small enough for tilling between planted rows, but its feature-packed tine system and commercial engine make it suitable for creating new beds.

Commercial Power

This tiller is powered by a GX160. A staple of commercial outdoor equipment, this compact overhead valve engine delivers reliable performance coupled with features that make it simple to use. An automatic decompression system makes pull starts easy, while Oil Alert keeps the engine from running when there isn’t enough oil to lubricate it. Everything from the aluminum pushrods to the air intake system is designed to quell noise and vibration.

In this application, the GX160 produces 4.8 HP and 7.6 lb-ft. of torque. The throttle is controlled by a lever on the handle, letting the operator slow the tines when cutting through soft ground and chunky soil, then speed them up to cut through areas with compacted soil and roots. At top engine speed, the tines spin at 84 RPM.

High-Performance Tines

The mid-tine design puts the weight of the engine directly over the tines, helping push them into the ground, reducing the effort needed on the handles. To get a consistent digging depth, the back is fitted with a tool-free adjustment depth bar. Once digging starts, this bar skims along the top of the un-tilled surface, keeping the machine from digging deeper while letting you know by feel when the tines start lifting up out of the ground.

The FC 600 has 13-inch diameter tines and a total tine width of 26 inches. The staggered design agitates as it cuts through soil, dislodging stones and breaking up compacted soil. Side discs come standard. These keep the tines from catching on fences and sidewalks and deflect dirt away from plants and pavement for easy cleanup.

Need to get a seedbed ready to plant? Honda offers a furrow attachment to create uniform V-shaped trenches.

Built for Bumps

Even the most careful user is bound to run into something, whether it’s a fence or a hidden rock. Up top, a large, tubular steel guard protects the front of the engine, and the handle and engine bed are reinforced to withstand bumps when getting close to trees, buildings and landscape features. Shielding around the tine seal shaft as well as axle protection prevents damage from stones tossed up by the tines.

Easy to Operate

The FC 600’s handle can be set to one of three positions, helping the operator maintain a comfortable hand position regardless of height. They’re long enough to provide ample leverage, so it just takes a little pressure to force the tines into the soil.

When the work is done, there’s no need to stoop down to keep the tines lifted off the ground. A front-mounted retractable transport wheel can be lowered into place when the tiller isn’t in use, making it easy to roll.

Warranty

Honda guarantees this tiller and its engine for 3 years or residential or commercial use.

Parts

When you need anything for your Honda power equipment or small engines, visit Hondalawnparts.com. As a certified dealer, we’re able to offer the complete line of Honda parts and accessories from air filters to furrowers. Not sure what you need? Once you select your model in our search engine, it can show you factory parts diagrams and descriptions so you can be sure you’re ordering the right part. We ship across the USA and Canada.

Troubleshooting Electric Starters

Troubleshooting Electric Starters

Is the electric starter on your Honda engine not working? Before you start ordering parts, there are a few things you should check to make sure the repairs you make will fix the problem.

Protecting Your Starter

Honda’s starters are designed to run for up to 5 seconds at a time. Running the motor longer can lead to overheating. If you’re having difficulty starting your engine, wait at least 10 seconds between starting attempts to let the starter cool.
If your engine has an electric starter, it probably has Honda’s Oil Alert system. It uses a float inside the crankcase that is wired to the ignition system. If the float is too low, the power to the spark plugs is cut, keeping the engine from starting. Always check the oil level first when trying to find out why the engine won’t start.

Testing and Maintaining the Battery

Check your owner’s manual on how to maintain the battery charge in your equipment. On some models, Honda recommends using a trickle charger, while others should be periodically recharged with a standard charger. If you have a hybrid snowblower, the batteries need to be disconnected from each other and charged separately.

The battery health can be checked by measuring the voltage at the terminals with a multimeter. A fully-charged 12 volt battery should be between 12.7 to 12.9 volts without a load when fully charged. If it’s below 12.4 volts, it’s time for a new battery.

Most batteries sold for these engines including Honda’s OEM units require maintenance. The chemical reaction inside the cells breaks down the water inside, and that evaporation will eventually leave the lead sheets inside uncovered. The cells should be refilled with distilled water up to the level marked on the battery, either on the side of the case or inside the cell. Overfilling could cause the water and acid to spill out, corroding the terminals, battery tray and anything underneath it.

The Battery is Fine, but the Motor Doesn’t Turn

Even if your battery is new, it still needs a clear path to power the starter. Loose and corroded connections can keep power from flowing through the system, making it seem like the starter motor has failed. There is also a fuse that prevents the starter from overloading. This fuse will either be connected to the positive wire between the battery and the starter, or located in the fuse box.

Corrosion and blown fuses are easy to identify with a visual inspection, but bad connections aren’t always as obvious. To test the connection, connect the positive probe to the positive terminal of the battery and the negative probe to the ground connector on the frame. This connection should be at least 12 volts.

There are several options for corrosion removal, but few work better than vinegar. Soaking bolts in vinegar overnight can strip off rust, while applying it directly with a brush can remove corrosion from contacts. If you operate in conditions where the connections are regularly exposed to moisture, consider coating them in a dielectric grease.

The ground connection needs to be made with bare metal. Clean the bolt and bolt hole to ensure direct contact between the wire and the frame.

Starter and Solenoid Issues

Once the battery and electrical connections have proven to be in good shape, it’s time to address the starter.

The solenoid, a small cylinder attached to the side of the starter, is a switch designed to handle heavy electric loads. If the starter does nothing when the start switch is on, it’s likely due to a bad solenoid.

The starter has three ways it can fail:

— A worn out starter gear will make a grinding noise when the starter is being used.

— A bad throwout bearing lets the starter gear spin, but won’t let it slide out to engage the flywheel and turn over the engine.

— Smoke from the starter indicates an overload due to high power demand or overheating.

If the starter is grinding, whirring or smoking, it needs to be replaced.

Getting New Electrical Parts for Your Honda Engine

From small hardware to solenoids, if it fits a Honda small engine, you can get it from www.hondalawnparts.com. Our site can show you factory information including parts descriptions and diagrams for your model so you can be sure you’re ordering exactly what you need. We can ship your order to any location in the U.S. or Canada.

Honda’s New EU2200i Generator

Honda's New EU2200i Generator

This spring, Honda is replacing their popular EU2000i generator with the new EU2200i. While it may look identical to its predecessor, it has a new engine, more power, and an easier to use design.

Power

The EU2200i makes 10% more power than the model it replaces, yet the size and weight are almost identical. In real-world use, that extra 200 watts is enough to power a 42-inch LCD TV. The extra power can also handle reactive loads better, taking the worry out of using appliances with electric motors.

This upgrade is thanks to a new engine/generator combo. It’s based on the GXR120, an engine built for earth rammers used in construction. The flywheel and alternator are built into a single unit to save space and weight. Higher grade magnets in the stator are thinner and maintain overall diameter. This reduces weight and increases power output. This configuration makes one dB less noise than the EU2000i’s GX100.

Increased torque lets the Eco Throttle keep the engine speeds down, further reducing noise and fuel consumption. The 0.95-gallon fuel tank can keep the generator running for 3.2 hours at constant 100% load and 8.1 hours at a 25% average load.

Output

This generator is rated at 120 volts with a steady output of 1,800 watts and a peak output of 2,000 watts. It uses an inverter with an in-house designed microprocessor to control output. This “clean” electricity is safe for powering electronics.

Convenience

Color-coded components make it easy to follow the steps needed to start the engine. Automatic decompression makes the engine easier to turn over with the pull starter.

Maintenance is also easier. A larger oil filter opening, a longer spout, and wider oil drain gutter make it easier to change the oil.

The generator includes a fuel shut off valve to burn off remaining fuel in the carburetor after use, avoiding most stale fuel issues. If there isn’t enough oil in the crankcase, Oil Alert can shut off th engine before it’s damaged. Redesigned case ducting maintains temperatures in high heat environments.

Models

The EU2200i comes with a 120-volt duplex outlet and a 12 volt DC outlet. Along with this standard model, there will be three other versions of this generator:

The Camo comes with a case wrapped in Realtree’s APG camouflage. It has a combination of sharp and soft detail woodlands patterns to simulate depth. Otherwise, it’s identical to the regular EU2200i.

The Companion can connect with all versions of the EU2200i and EU2000i, doubling available power. This model has a 30 amp, 125-volt locking plug outlet and a 20 amp, 125-volt single outlet. This generator is a great choice for backup power.

The EB2200i is designed with commercial users in mind. It meets LA-ETL and OSHA requirements and comes with 20A 125V GFCI Duplex outlet and a GFCI neutral bond.

All models weigh 46.5 lbs.

Warranty

Honda guarantees all versions of this generator for three years of residential or commercial use.

Getting Parts and Accessories for Honda Generators

Whether you plan on getting an EU2200i soon or you already have a Honda generator, you can get everything you need for it from www.hondalawnparts.com. As a certified dealer, we’re able to offer OEM parts and accessories including parallel cables, covers and even transfer switches. Check out our generator accessory section, or pick your model from our search engine. It has factory parts diagrams and descriptions that let you find exactly what you need. We can ship your order to any location in the U.S. or Canada.

Storing Your Honda Snowblower

Storing Your Honda Snowblower

It’s been a rough winter, but it won’t be long before winter is replaced by spring and it will be time to put away your Honda snowblower. Proper preparation will protect your equipment when it’s in storage and make it easier to get running again once winter weather returns.

Washing

The auger housing, chute, and wheels or tracks can be rinsed off with a garden hose. Everything else should be wiped down with a moist rag to prevent water from seeping into the engine and gearbox where it can dilute the oil.

Once dry, apply some touch-up paint to damaged areas and a light oil or silicone spray to exposed metal components.

Lubrication

Refer to your manual to see the grease points on your model. Usually, this will include the chute guide, chute rolling gear, control lever links, chute tension bolts, auger height pivot point and, if you have a track model, the frame pivot point on the frame just inside of the tracks. There are no grease fittings on these points: simply smear some grease on the joints and move them back and forth to ensure even coverage. Some wheeled models have greaseable wheel axles, and the HS1336iAS also needs to have grease applied to the rolling cylinder pivot that tilts the auger.

A light, non-detergent oil should be applied to the auger and blower impellers at any point where they meet with the transmission or axles.

Fuel

Treated or not, fuel should not be left in your snowblower’s engine for over three months. To drain the fuel, use a siphon or hand pump to drain the tank, then switch the fuel valve on and unscrew the drain knob or screw from the base of the carburetor, letting the remaining gas pour into a suitable container.

If you have a Honda GX-series engine, the drain knob or screw threads into a sediment cup. Once the fuel has been drained, remove this cup and clean it thoroughly. Always use a new O-ring when reinstalling the cup.

Oil

The oil should be changed before storage regardless of the hours put on the machine since the last service. A small amount of oil should also be added to the inside of the cylinder. To do this, remove the spark plug and pour one to two teaspoons (5-10 ml) of oil through the hole. Rotate the engine a couple times to distribute the oil, then reinstall the plug.

Battery

If your snowblower has an electric starter, disconnect the negative battery terminal. Honda recommends recharging the batteries at least every 6 months while they’re in storage. The batteries on the HS1336iAS should be disconnected from each other and charged separately.

Storing

Parking your snowblower on a sheet of cardboard will protect the tires and tracks from direct contact with the cement, which can damage the rubber in extreme cold. It also makes it easy to find fuel and oil leaks when you pull it out of storage next winter.

Keep the snowblower away from any source of flame or spark. This includes furnaces, power tools and metalworking. While the fuel system may be empty, there can be enough residual gas to create the fumes needed to cause a fire. Make sure the fuel valve is set to “OFF” to minimize leakage of any residual fuel.

Keep your snowblower covered with a purpose-built cover, not a tarp. Tarps can’t breathe, allowing moisture to collect on metal components and promote rust. Always let the engine and exhaust cool completely before putting the cover on to keep it from melting.

Getting Parts for Your Honda Snowblower

From covers to major components, you can get everything you need for your Honda snowblower at www.hondalawnparts.com. Our site has built-in factory diagrams and descriptions to help you find the parts you need, and since we’re a certified Honda Power Equipment and Honda Engines dealer, you know you’ll always get quality OEM replacements. We can ship your order to any address in the U.S. or Canada.

Operating EB2800i and EG2800i Generators

Operating EB2800i and EG2800i Generators

The home backup-focused EG2800i and job site-ready EB2800i are recent additions to Honda’s generator line up, providing the self-grounding and tough construction of a frame generator in a lightweight package. If you own or are buying one of these generators, there are a few things you should know about these units to get the most out of them.

Before You Begin

Carbon monoxide from the exhaust can kill you in a matter of minutes, even if it’s running in a garage with the door and windows open. Always run the generator outdoors at least three feet away from buildings.

If you just got this generator, take a look at our earlier article on setting them up. Oil needs to be added to the engine before its first start-up.

Controls

Most of the controls can be found on the panel at the front of the generator.

Choke rod: upper left
Engine On/Off switch: a large red switch on the lower left
Indicator lights: To the right of the choke rod
Eco throttle: To the right of the engine switch
Power receptacles: On the right side of the control panel
Circuit protectors: Just to the right of the receptacles.
Ground terminal: Lower right

There are also three areas on the engine itself that you’ll need to find to run the generator:

Fuel valve lever: On the right side, directly below the fuel tank
Starter handle: On the right side, next to the control panel.
Dipstick/filler cap: On the left side near the base of the engine.

Tips for Starting

The Oil Alert system will cut power to the ignition if the oil level is too low to protect the engine. If the system is tripped, it will switch on the bottom indicator light. Even if it hasn’t been tripped, it’s a good idea to check the oil level before starting the engine.

Before starting, make sure the generator is at least 10 feet away from fuel containers to prevent the ignition of gas fumes.

The fuel lever and engine need to be switched on for the motor to start, while the Eco Throttle should be off. If the engine is cold, the choke rod should be pulled out to the “Closed” position.

Once the engine is running, if everything is working correctly, the “OUTPUT INDICATOR” light should be green.

Stopping

Unplug all cords from the outlets and turn the engine switch to “OFF.” If you won’t be using the generator for a while, turn the fuel lever to “OFF” to keep fuel from leaking into the carburetor.

Power Demands

Both the EB2800i and EG2800i have a maximum output of 2,800 watts. With 120 volt appliances, that’s equivalent to 23.3 amps. Power draw at this maximum load should be kept below 30 minutes at a time. For longer power use, the maximum draw should be limited to 2,500 watts or 20.8 amps. If there is a short or the power demand exceeds 2,800 watts, the Overload Alarm in the middle of the indicator lights will switch on, and the circuit protector will trip.

Electric motors are reactive loads: they take more power to start up than they need to run, causing spikes in electricity demand. Motors are used in air conditioners and refrigerators as well as more obvious appliances like drills and mixers.

Eco Throttle

When switched on, the Eco Throttle automatically reduces engine speed to match generator output to the current load. This conserves fuel, reduces noise and saves wear and tear on the generator. Eco Throttle should be switched on once the engine is running.

GFCI Testing

When using the EB2800i at a job site, OSHA regulations require testing of the Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI) system before the generator can be used as a power source. Here’s how you test the outlets:

1. Start the engine.
2. Unplug all cords from the outlets
3. Make sure the circuit protection is on for both outlets by pushing in the buttons.
4. Push the “TEST” button in the middle of each outlet. The “RESET” button should pop up, and a small green GFCI LED next to this button will light up. Push the RESET button back in to use the outlet.

If the reset button won’t push down or the GFCI light stays on after reset, the generator should be inspected and repaired before use.

Grounding

These generators are grounded to the frame, which in almost all cases is enough to meet the grounding requirements for the National Electric Code (NEC) and OSHA so long as the generator is sitting on the ground. If external grounding is needed, a wire can be connected from the grounding terminal to a grounding electrode.

Maintaining Your New Generator

www.hondalawnparts.com is a certified dealer for Honda Power Equipment so we can provide you with factory original replacements for everything on your generator. With built-in factory parts descriptions and diagrams, it’s easy to find exactly what you need, and we can ship your order to any address in the U.S. or Canada.

How to Test Your Lawn’s Soil

honda fertilizerTesting soil is standard practice for professional landscapers, but if you’re new to this process, it can be daunting. How do you know you’re getting a good sample, and how do you act on the results?

Preparing a Soil Sample

If you have areas that need different soil characteristics, say, a lawn and a flower garden, you should perform a test for each area. The soil should be dry and all tools should be cleaned beforehand to ensure a reliable reading. Make sure to get the sample sent in at least a couple weeks ahead of when you plan on fertilizing to ensure you’ll have the results in on time.

Start by digging several holes 6-8 inches deep. These holes should be spaced out around the soil and include areas where plants are thriving and failing.

Slice into the side of each hole all the way down and place into a bucket. Once you have soil from each hole, mix it together and spread it out on a newspaper. Once it’s dry, it can be packaged and sent to the lab.

Understanding Test Results

The results you get from your soil test will vary: most DIY kits only test acidity, while a test from your local extension office will include nutrient information so that you can apply the correct chemicals and fertilizers to help your lawn flourish. What do these results mean?

Soil Acidity
Acidity is rated in pH, which is a number between 1 and 14. 7 is neutral, while lower numbers are acidic or “sour,” and higher numbers are alkaline or “sweet.” Most plants thrive in soil with a pH of 6.2-7.2, while some plants including blueberries and rhododendrons prefer more acidic soil. Soil is usually alkaline in the central and southwest U.S, and acidic in the rest of the country.

Nutrients
This includes phosphorus (P,) potassium (K,) calcium (Ca,) magnesium (Mg,) and sulfur (S.) Micronutrients including iron, manganese, copper, zinc, and boron may also be listed in areas with sandy soils.

Toxic chemicals
Aluminum (Al) can harm root construction and reduce phosphorus solubility, although acidic soil-loving plants are usually less affected. Aluminum is hard to extract, but decreasing soil acidity can reduce its solubility.
Lead (Pb) can be absorbed by plants, making it unsafe to eat vegetables grown in soil with a lead content higher than 300 ppm (parts per million.)

Adjusting pH

Acidic soils can be brought closer to neutral by using lime, which is simply powdered limestone.

Alkaline soils can be acidified with sulfur, gypsum, Sphagnum peat moss or organic compost. Peat moss can be expensive and compost may not be readily available, making sulfur and gypsum the most common treatments.

Picking the Right Fertilizer

While fertilizer blends are marketed for specific purposes, their function comes down to the formulation. Somewhere on the fertilizer bag will be a set of three numbers, such as “18-9-9.” These indicate the proportion of nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium, sometimes labeled “N-P-K.” The “P” stands for phosphate (P2O2) and the “K” refers to potash (K2O,) materials used to provide plant-available nutrients. Each number is a percentage, but these elements will never add up to 100 since part of the fertilizer needs to be fillers to make it easier to handle.

Each nutrient helps plants in different ways:

Nitrogen is a critical component for the manufacturing of chlorophyll, which is used by plants to capture and process sunlight. High nitrogen fertilizers are promoted for use with new seeds.

Phosphorus is used to build roots and helps plants flower, so it’s often sold as “bloom booster.”

Potassium helps with a wide range of functions including drought resistance, cold resistance and the building of roots and chlorophyll.

Your soil report will show you exactly what your top soil is deficient in, letting you apply fertilizer accordingly. Always err on the side of caution as too much of any nutrient can cause plant burning and even death.

Micronutrient fertilizers are also available, but since adverse effects are unlikely, these mixes include every micronutrient so they can correct any deficiencies.

Soil Additives

Other nutrients can be added using chemicals:

– Lime and gypsum add calcium.
– Lime and Epsom salts (magnesium sulfate) add magnesium
– Gypsum, potassium sulfate, sul-po-mag, manure, and compost add sulfur

Since lime makes soil more alkaline and both sulfur and gypsum make it more acidic, these chemicals should be avoided if your soil already has the right pH.

Take the Work Out of Fertilizing

Whether you’re using your mower to mulch grass, turning garden soil with a tiller or using a spreader to deposit fertilizer, chances are that equipment is built by Honda or uses one of their engines. Where can you turn when you need to maintain or repair this equipment? www.hondalawnparts.com. We’re a certified dealer so we can provide you with the OEM parts you need, whether you live in the U.S. or Canada.

Using a Honda Generator for Construction

Honda-Commercial-Generator

While the proliferation of Lithium-Ion technology has made portable tools a more viable choice in construction, there’s plenty of equipment that needs AC power. To serve these users, Honda makes the EB-Series of generators. They’re built for the demands of commercial and rental use, are offered a range of outputs, use low noise designs and are OSHA compliant. How do you know which one is right for you? Here’s what you need to know to work out your use case.

How Many Watts Do I Need?

As a general rule of thumb, Honda recommends a 2,000 watt generator to run a single tool, 3,000-4,000 watts to run two tools and over 4,000 watts to run several tools. However, your specific use case can vary a lot depending on the equipment that will be drawing power from the generator.

The easiest way to calculate the power needed for a tool or appliance is to check the data tag, usually located on the body of the device. If this tag has worn off, the same information can usually be found in the owner’s manual, or measured using an appliance load tester. To convert amps into watts, multiply the rated amps by the voltage, either 120 or 240.

Electric motors create a “reactive” load, requiring a lot more power when they start than when they run. To compensate for this, Honda’s generators have a maximum load capacity that can be sustained for a few seconds to help deal with these load spikes. Devices with these loads include air compressors, power tools, grinders and pumps. Manufacturers of commercial equipment will usually state both the starting and running power in amps or watts on the data label. Some labeling systems use a letter to indicate the starting amps per horsepower:

A – 26.0
L – 83.3
B – 29.5
M – 93.3
C – 33.3
N – 104.0
D – 37.4
P – 116.6
E – 41.6
R – 133.3
F – 46.6
S – 149.9
G – 52.4
T – 166.6
H – 59.0
U – 186.6
J – 66.6
V – Over 186.6

For example, if you have a ¼ hp drill press with a “P” code, it requires 29.15 amps to start or 3,498 watts. If there is no code or second number, assume the starting power will be three times as much as the running power.

When calculating power demands, remember that you probably won’t be turning all your devices on at the same time. The generator you buy should be able to support all the equipment you may be using at one time plus the highest single reactive load for your equipment.

Can I Power Electronics with an Industrial Generator?

Inverter generators including CycloConverter models like the EB3000c create a clean power waveform, making them safe to use with electronics as well as tools with computerized control systems. This means you can use them to power Li-Ion charging stations, computers, and radios.

Can I Power Three Phase Equipment with a Generator?

No. While most EB models can provide 240-volt power, this electricity is single phase, switching fully between negative and positive polarity. In a three phase system, three power waveforms are combined, keeping the polarity fairly steady. Welders and some large electric motors need three phase power to work properly.

NFPA and OSHA Compliance

OSHA establishes what needs to be done to ensure a safe work environment, while the National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA) regulations handle how those standards are met when involving fire safety. NFPA rules also apply outside of work use. For generators, these standards bodies come into play in two ways:

OSHA has specific requirements for generators used in the workplace covering fire safety, grounding and circuit protection. The NFPA issues rules for fire compliance to meet OSHA’s requirements. All Honda EB Series generators are OSHA compliant.

The NFPA issues guidelines for using generators for emergency backup power for all users, commercial and private. All Honda generators comply with NFPA regulations if they’re installed and used correctly.

Full compliance requires correct usage of the generator, which includes keeping it outside of buildings and away from walls to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning. When adding a generator to your equipment, you’ll need to have a way to get that power to the work area via cables and weather protection to prevent shorts from rain.

Getting Parts and Accessories for Industrial Grade Honda Generators

Hondalawnparts.com is a certified Honda Power Equipment dealer, so we can offer OEM parts and accessories to keep your generator working including cables, transfer switches and load testers. Our massive warehouse lets us keep most popular parts in stock for fast shipping to any address in the U.S. or Canada.

The HRC216HDA: Honda’s Latest Commercial Walk-Behind Mower

Honda-HRC216-Lawn-Mower-side-right

While the commercial market is dominated by riding mowers with massive decks and engines, walk-behind mowers are still a necessity for trimming hard to reach areas. Honda’s HRC mowers are designed for these users, integrating professional level quality and riding mower features into a walk-behind. The latest model in this lineup is the HRC216HDA, which bridges the gap between the push PDA and hydrostatic drive HXA.

Engine

The HDA is powered by a GXV160 engine. It has a dual element air cleaner which has a reusable foam element that stops larger debris, providing a longer life for the inner paper filter, while the Oil Alert system prevents the engine from running if it doesn’t have enough oil, preventing damage to internal components. A fuel shutoff valve is included to keep the carburetor from flooding during transport, maintenance, and storage. On this model, it comes with a manual throttle, letting you bring the motor down to idle so you can keep it running while emptying the clipping bag.

Deck

The motor sits on a 21-inch deck made out of 16 gauge steel with rolled edges like you’d find on a stamped riding mower deck. A large front bumper protects the deck from scrapes and impacts and provides a tie-down point so the paint doesn’t get scraped up when loading the mower on a truck or trailer.

The deck uses Honda’s MicroCut twin blade system, slicing grass twice with each pass. This design creates an excellent finish and can handle mulching and bagging in conditions that would bog down other mowers; Honda is so confident of its performance that they make side discharge an option since most users won’t need it. The deck can be set to one of 8 mowing heights ranging from ¾ to 4 inches, while the onboard bag can carry up to 2.5 bushels of clippings before being emptied.

Drive System

The HDA has more in common with a riding mower than just the deck: it also uses a hydrostatic transmission. Using the handle-mounted lever, the forward speed can be set to anywhere between 2.1 to 4 mph. The cruise control function lets you keep the speed set when shutting off or idling the mower: once you close the bail, the mower will return to its original pace. If you need to make a short stop to pick up branches or empty the bag, the flywheel brake engages as you leave the handle, stopping the blades immediately for safe stops without shutting off the engine.

Maintenance

The transmission is connected to the engine by a shaft drive, so there are no belts to replace on this mower. Sealed, adjustable cables are used for the controls for years of smooth action. The wheels are made out of Honda’s super durable NeXite polymer and ride on sealed ball bearings. These features make servicing the HDA more like a push mower, eliminating everything aside from engine maintenance and blade sharpening.

Warranty

Honda warranties the mower for one year of commercial use, while the engine is guaranteed for two years. For residential owners, the mower and engine are both covered for two years.

Servicing and Parts

Getting parts for maintaining and repairing the HRC216HDA is easy: just visit www.hondalawnparts.com. We’re a certified Honda Small Engine Equipment dealer, which means we offer OEM replacements for everything Honda from portable generators to professional mowers. Our site makes finding the right part easy by showing factory parts diagrams and descriptions so you can quickly identify what you need, and we can ship those parts to any location in the U.S. and Canada.

Using a Honda Generator During Storms

Honda GeneratorA Honda generator can keep power going when a storm cuts your home’s connection to the grid so you can keep televisions, radios, and phones on to monitor the forecast while keeping a few appliances running for comfort. However, getting the generator up and running can be daunting during bad weather. With a little planning, you can make the switch from grid to generator power a lot easier.

Storage

Like any piece of small engine equipment, a generator needs to be kept in a cool, dry place. However, it also needs to be in a place that will be accessible during a storm, letting you position it where it can be used. That means carrying it or rolling it to a place that keeps it at least three feet away from buildings so that carbon monoxide from the exhaust won’t reach lethal concentrations. Make sure you can easily move the generator from its storage spot to its operating spot, taking care of any obstacles that may be in the way.

Cords

Since you can’t bring your generator into your home, you need a way to get power from it to the appliances you want to use. When shopping for extension cords, make sure to check the amperage: it needs to be at least as high as the maximum amp output of the socket it will be plugged into.

Larger generators include a twist lock outlet. This keeps the cord attached at the generator end when running long distances, but it also requires a special extension cord with the right end. The type of twist lock cord you’ll need will depend on the power mode and attached appliances: all Honda generators can produce 120-volt power, while some have the ability to make 240-volt power for high-demand appliances and can even switch some outlets between 120 and 240-volt output. Cords are available with ends including multiple 120-volt sockets that use power directly, converter cables that turn 240 volts into 120, and 240-volt sockets for high power demand devices like water pumps. 120-volt power is fed through an inverter to get a clean waveform that’s safe for sensitive electric devices, but 240-volt power comes directly from the generator and shouldn’t be used for these devices.

Fuel

The fuel used in your generator should be no more than 30 days old, or 90 days old if it’s been treated with a stabilizer. Instead of storing fuel just for the generator, keep some fuel on hand for the generator and other power equipment including mowers and lawn care tools so it’s used up quickly. Honda’s generators can run for several hours on a tank of gas, so one full tank should be enough to keep appliances going until the power is restored or it’s safe for you to leave your home and buy more fuel.

Oil

Honda’s Oil Alert system will shut down the engine to prevent it from being damaged if there isn’t enough oil, but that also means your generator won’t be able to make power. Keep some extra oil on hand and check the oil level before moving the generator out of storage.

Linking the Generator to Your Home Wiring

Your generator can feed into your home’s electrical system directly using a transfer switch. This device is required by law when linking a generator to home wiring because it isolates your home from the grid. Without this switch, power can enter the grid, shocking workers who are trying to repair the lines. This switch needs to be installed by a professional electrician to make sure it’s working correctly. Once installed, the generator can be moved to the switch and plugged in so it can supply electricity when the power fails.

Keep Your Generator Running with Genuine Honda Parts

As a certified Honda small engine equipment dealer, www.hondalawnparts.com carries everything you need for your Honda equipment. Along with replacement parts for your generator, we carry genuine Honda accessories including transfer switches and cable adapters so you can rest easy knowing you’ll be ready when storms strike. We ship across the U.S. and Canada.