HRC Commercial Walk-Behind Mowers

HRC Commercial Walk-Behind Mowers

Even the largest operations need a walk-behind mower on hand to do work in confined spaces and around obstacles that block larger machines, but most small models are residential mowers that can’t handle commercial demands. Honda’s HRC professional mowers are built for this niche, offering professional-quality components in a small walk-behind package.

Deck

All versions of the HRC use a 21-inch deck stamped from 16 gauge steel with an integrated front bumper and edge guards. This deck is supported by 9-inch wheels made out of NeXite, the same super strong plastic Honda uses to make decks for some of their residential mowers. These wheels ride on sealed ball bearings, so they roll easy and require no maintenance.

The deck can be used for rear discharge, bagging or mulching. Honda’s MicroCut design uses a high lift blade and a flat blade stacked on top of each other. With each pass, these blades cut twice, leaving behind smaller clippings, reducing grass volume by up to 30% and preventing clumping on wet grass. The onboard bag holds up to 2.5 bushels of clippings, and the deck has 8 cutting heights ranging from ¾ inch to 4 inches.

Engines

There are two engines available in these mowers: the GSV160 and the GXV160.

The GSV160 is an overhead cam design based on Honda’s residential GCV engines, but it uses upgraded components to handle commercial duty. This includes a cast iron cylinder liner, stronger crankshaft bearings, and a two-stage air cleaner. It still retains the low noise, low vibrations and easy starting of the GCV. This engine is only available with the HRX216PDA.

The HDA and HXA are both powered by the GXV160. The GX line of overhead valve commercial engines are renowned for their reliability and have become the de facto standard for professional small engine equipment. Like the GSV, it has a dual element air filter. Both engines are fitted with a manual fuel shutoff to prevent carburetor flooding during transit.

Control

The fold-down handle is made from one-inch tubing, giving it strength and providing a wide grip area that reduces hand fatigue. The grip area is angled to limit wrist tension, and the hand controls use sealed, adjustable cables that require no maintenance and won’t turn rusty while in storage.

Drive

The PDA is a push mower, while the HDA and HXA use a hydrostatic transmission. This unit is as small as a conventional geared transmission, but it delivers the same infinite speed adjustment of its larger counterparts. The cruise control function lets you set a speed, then return to it by squeezing the bail, even if you’ve had to shut off the engine. The transmission connects to the crankshaft using a shaft drive, so there are no belts to change.

The HRC216HXA also comes with Roto-Stop. Instead of mounting the blades directly onto the crankshaft, they’re engaged using a clutch. The blades can be stopped for safety when moving away from the mower without stopping the engine. That means you won’t need to restart the engine after moving debris or branches.

Warranty

Both engines offered in the HRC line have a two-year warranty, while the rest of the mower is covered for one year of commercial use or two years of residential use.

Getting Parts for Your Commercial Mower

As a certified dealer for Honda Engines and Honda Power Equipment, www.hondalawnparts.com can ship anything you need for your HRC mower to any address in the U.S. or Canada. Finding what you need it easy: just pick your model and serial number, and our search engine will show you factory parts diagrams and descriptions.

HRX Walk-Behind Mowers

HRX Walk-Behind Mowers

Are you looking for the ultimate residential walk behind mower? Honda’s HRX series has flexible drive systems, a high performance cutting system and an advanced composite deck. This makes it one of the easiest-to-use mowers on the market while also being able to mulch and bag clippings, even when the grass is wet.

Engine

This mower is powered by Honda’s GCV190. It uses an overhead cam design with a resin camshaft and internal timing belt, keeping the engine light and the part count low. The result is less noise and vibration without compromising performance.

Automatic decompression makes this engine easy to turn over, and an automatic choke means you can start mowing as soon as the engine is running. Some models also come with an electric starter. It’s powered by a small handle-mounted battery that charges off of the engine’s electrical system.

Superior Cutting Performance

The deck comes with Honda’s 4-in-1 Versamow system with modes for rear discharge, mulching, bagging and leaf shredding. The Clip Director lets you vary how much grass is mulched and how much is bagged, letting you mulch the maximum amount of grass without clumping.

Cutting is handled by a pair of MicroCut blades. With each pass, these blades trim the grass twice, improving the finish and making clippings more compact so the bag needs to be emptied less often.

A Dent-Proof, Rust-Proof Deck

The deck is made out of NeXite, an extremely strong, durable plastic similar to the materials used to make car bumpers and the outside layer of football helmets. Because this deck is cast as a single piece, it can be made at higher tolerances than a metal deck, resulting in an increased vacuum and air circulation for better mowing performance. It’s also nearly impossible to crack the deck, it won’t dent and it can’t rust. Honda is so confident about NeXite’s performance that they back it with a lifetime warranty.

Two versions of the HRX come with Honda’s trademark Roto-Stop system. This disconnects the blade shaft from the crankshaft and stops the blade. That means you can safely walk away from the mower to dump clippings or move a branch out of the way without having to restart the engine.

Self Propulsion

There are two drive systems available on the HRX:

Select Drive lets you set a speed range using the knob on the handle. From there, you can squeeze the handle to engage the drive system and get the speed you want.

The hydrostatic drive system comes with cruise control to set your operating speed. Pull the bail, and the mower starts rolling. If you have to stop for a moment, it will return to the previous speed without having to make adjustments.

With both models, the maximum drive speed is 4 MPH.

Models

Honda makes 5 versions of the HRX. Here’s the equipment you get with each model:

  • Electric start – VLA, HZA
  • Roto-Stop – VYA, HZA
  • Select Drive – VKA, VLA, VYA
  • Hydrostatic drive – HYA, HZA

Warranty

The NeXite deck comes with a lifetime warranty, while the engine is covered for three years of residential use. The rest of the mower is covered for 5 years.

Sourcing Parts

You can get everything you need for your Honda mower straight from your browser: just visit www.hondalawnparts.com. As a certified dealer, we’re able to ship OEM parts to any address in the U.S. or Canada. Finding parts is easy, too: just select your model and serial number, and our site can show you parts diagrams for your model, letting you see where everything fits.

Maintaining Your HRX Mower

Maintaining Your HRX Mower

The Honda HRX is arguably the best residential walk behind mower on the market, but like any outdoor equipment, it won’t last if it isn’t cared for. Here’s what you need to do to keep your mower working for years to come.

Maintenance Schedule

  • Before each use: Check the blades, rear shield, blade control, grass bag, blade, oil and air filter.
  • After the first 5 hours of use: Change the oil.
  • After the first 25 hours of use: Clean the air filter and adjust the blade control cable and drive clutch cable.
  • Every 50 hours or 6 months: Change the oil and clean the air filter.
  • Every 100 hours or year: Check the spark plug, clean the spark arrester (if equipped), and check all cable adjustments.
  • Every 150 hours or two years: Replace the air filter and spark plug and grease the rear wheel adjuster bushings.

Honda also recommends having the engine professionally serviced every year or 100 hours. The mechanic will check the valve clearance, idle speed and general condition of the mower.

Blades

The blades on these mowers can be handled like any other mower blade. They should be as sharp as a butter knife, and they should be replaced if the edges are worn, bent or cracked.

To access the blades, disconnect the spark plug cap and turn the fuel valve to “OFF,” then tilt the mower on its right side. Make sure the fuel cap is near the top of the mower.

When installing the blades, the curved ends of the lower blade should match up with the angled edges of the upper blade. When installing the blade bolts, the outer edge of the curved washers should face the blades. Torque the bolts to 36-43 ft-lbs.

Oil

Honda recommends 5W-30 or 10W-30 for normal operating temperatures, while SAE 30 can be used at temperatures above 50°F. The engine holds 12-13.5 oz of oil, or about a third of a quart.

The engine does not have a drain plug. To drain the oil, either use a siphon pump, or tilt the mower on its side so that the oil flows out of the filler neck into a container for recycling.

Air Filter

To access the filter, push down on the tabs on the air filter cover, then swing the cover downward.

To clean the filter, tap it against a hard surface or blow it out with compresses air. Limit the air pressure to 30 psi.

Spark Plug

The electrode gap should be between 0.028 and 0.031 inches, or 0.7 to 0.8 mm. It can be removed and installed with a 13/16 inch spark plug wrench.

When reinstalling a plug, thread it in by hand before using the wrench. Once the plug seats, turn it 1/8 to ¼ turn if it’s a used plug, or ½ turn if you’re installing a new plug. The plug should be torqued to 14 ft-lbs.

Spark Arrester

To access the arrester, remove the three flange bolts on the muffler cover, then remove the set screw holding the arrester inside the exhaust outlet.

Clean the arrester with a wire brush. If it has holes or other damage, it should be replaced. If you don’t have a spark arrester, one can be added to comply with local fire regulations.

Charging the Battery on Electric Start Models

The battery is normally charged by the engine electrical system, but it may need to be recharged after the mower has been in storage. This battery should only be charged with a Honda battery charger. Using an automotive charger will damage the battery.

1. Remove the three screws on the battery cover, located on the side of the box that houses the starter switch.
2. Slide the battery out of the box, then disconnect the wires on the battery terminals.
3. Connect the charger to the terminals, then plug the charger into a 120 volt outlet.
4. Let the battery charge for 8-24 hours. Charging for longer will damage the battery.
5. Disconnect the charger.
6. Connect the wires to the battery terminals.
7. Place the battery into the case with the terminals facing the handle. Route the wires so that they go across the top of the battery.
8. Reinstall the battery cover.

Get the Parts You Need for Your Honda Straight From Your Browser

Hondalawnparts.com is a certified Honda Engines and Power Equipment dealer, which means we can ship the OEM parts you need to maintain your HRX mower straight to your door. Select your model and serial number, and our site will show you parts that will fit your specific mower, complete with factory descriptions and exploded parts diagrams. We ship to both the U.S. and Canada.

Using the WH15X Pump

Using the WH15X Pump

At 20 lbs, the WX15X is perfect for small jobs from garden irrigation to draining the bilge on small boats. Here’s what you need to know to get the most from this water pump.

What Will the WX15X Pump?

This pump is designed to pump fresh water. Pumping corrosive liquids like seawater and mine runoff will damage the pump, while pumping flammable liquids including gasoline and diesel can cause a fire or explosion.

This is a dewatering pump, so it can handle water with solids up to 3/8 of an inch (10 mm) in diameter. It’s strong enough to pick up muck water, so it’s safe to use when draining ponds.

Pump Location

The WX15’s maximum total head is 121 feet under ideal conditions. Suction head can be no more than 26 feet, and may be less in high altitude operation. When setting up the pump, position it so that it is close to the surface of the water, making up the difference in height to the drainage point by using the discharge hose. Reducing suction head will reduce the time the pump takes to self-prime.

Keep the pump at least three feet away from building walls and other equipment. Heat coming off of the engine could start a fire, and confined spaces can concentrate poisonous carbon monoxide from the exhaust.

Hoses

Both the suction and outlet ports are 1.5 inches in diameter. The suction port should be used with a 1.5-inch diameter non-collapsible hose. The outlet can be connected to a standard hose that is at least 1.5 inches in diameter. Using a wider hose will reduce fluid resistance, improving performance. The shorter the hoses are, the better the pump performance will be.

Hose clamps are included with the pump, but separate hose connectors will be needed to mate the hoses to the pump housing. Inspect the packing inside the hose coupling before installation. If this part fails, there won’t be a good seal between the hose and the pump port.

The suction hose should always be fitted with a strainer to keep large debris from reaching the pump and damaging the impeller. A basket strainer is included with the WX15X, but a skimmer strainer is a better choice if you need to completely drain a body of water.

If the discharge hose needs to cross a road, run it directly from one side of the road to the other. Place boards along the hose to support vehicles crossing the road: this will keep the tires from pushing down on the hose and cutting off water flow, which can damage the pump.

Priming

Before starting the engine, water needs to be added to the pump chamber to prevent overheating and seal damage. If the engine is accidentally started with a dry pump, shut it off immediately and let the pump cool off before priming and restarting.

To prime the pump, remove the cap on top of the pump housing. Add water until it’s even with the bottom of the pump outlet, then reinstall the filler cap. Once the engine is running, it can take a couple of minutes for the pump to draw water through the hoses.

Starting the Engine

1. Move the fuel valve lever, located to the right of the air box, to the “ON” position.
2. If the engine is cold, move the choke lever, located above the air box, to the “CLOSED” position. If the engine was recently started, leave the choke in the “OPEN” position.
3. Move the throttle lever, located below the fuel lever, halfway between “SLOW” and “FAST.”
4. Turn the ignition switch to the “ON” position.
5. Hold the carrying handle and pull the starter grip.
6. As the engine warms up, gradually move the choke to the “OPEN” position.

Stopping the Engine

1. Move the throttle lever to the “SLOW” position.
2. Turn the ignition switch to the “OFF” position.
3. Turn the fuel valve to the “OFF” position.

After Use

Once the engine is off, remove the drain plug on the base of the pump and the priming cap on the top of the pump. Pour fresh water into the pump to flush out any dirt or debris. Once all the water has drained, reinstall the plug and cap.

Get the Parts and Accessories You Need for Your Honda Water Pump

Hondalawnparts.com can ship OEM parts and accessories for you WX15X to your door whether you live in the U.S. or Canada. We carry the full line of Honda water pump accessories including hoses, strainers, and clamps as well as parts like spark plugs and pump seals. Browse our pump accessory section to find the right combination of hoses and adapters to fit your needs, or search by pump model and serial number to find compatible parts for your pump.

Horizontal vs. Vertical Engines

Horizontal vs. Vertical Engines

Drive shaft orientation is one of the most misunderstood aspects of small engines, leading to a lot of fallacies about the advantages and disadvantages of each design. How do you know which one you own? Does one design last more than the other? Is there a reason you should choose a vertical shaft engine over a horizontal shaft or vice versa? Here’s what you need to know to separate fact from fiction.

Model Designations

All Honda engine model names start with two letters to designate their engine family. Currently, this includes the GX and GC. If there’s a “V” after these two letters, the engine has a vertical shaft. Engines that are the same model family and displacement share the same basic design and provide identical performance no matter how the shaft is oriented.

Engine Wear and Lubrication

Myths are persistent about one design wearing out faster than the other, but these can be attributed to a misunderstanding about how these engines work.

Some older vertical shaft engines have the intake and exhaust valves positioned vertically. This draws hot exhaust gases along the bottom cylinder surface, resulting in slightly more wear on that side.
This has led people into believing that gravity is a factor, leading to increased wear on vertical shaft engines, but the same wear pattern is found around the exhaust no matter where the valve is positioned.

On the other hand, some people believe that horizontal shaft engines will wear out faster because the upright position of the cylinders keeps them from being lubricated as well as a vertical shaft engine. Both horizontal and vertical engines with splash lubrication use a dipper or scoop to pick up oil in the crankcase and fling it onto the components inside the engine. Even at idle, oil is being flung around the engine at a rate of 20-30 times per second, overcoming any issues with gravity by sheer force. Likewise, while the oil channel location may be a little different, pressurized oiling systems still pump oil up to the head and let it flow back to the crankcase in both engine designs.

Driving Equipment

When engineers choose an engine, they decide on crankshaft orientation based on what makes the most sense to power the equipment. For example, the blade can be bolted directly to the drive shaft on a vertical shaft engine when used in a walk-behind mower, while a horizontal shaft is perfect for the pulley system used on an edger or the impeller in a water pump.

The only time you’ll likely have a choice between vertical and horizontal shaft engines is when you buy a riding mower. Some ZTR manufacturers choose to use horizontal shaft engines to reduce the overall length of the mower, while some older lawn tractors including several of Honda’s own models use a horizontal shaft engine to connect with the axle using a shaft drive. To connect the horizontal shaft to a vertically-oriented pulley, these mowers use a mule drive. This guides the belt along a pair of pulleys, bending them at a 90-degree angle. These added bends are more efficient and reliable than they sound, but they do complicate belt replacement.

Blurring the Line: Mini 4 Stroke Engines

The GX25 and GX35 are technically vertical shaft engines, but their oiling system is designed to work at any angle. This lets them be used in place of two-stroke engines in handheld devices like string trimmers. These engines also find use in stationary equipment, mounted either horizontally, as seen in Honda’s own WX10 water pump, or vertically to power small augers.

Get Everything You Need for Your Honda Engine

No matter how your engine is built or what it’s powering, you can get the parts you need for it from www.hondalawnparts.com. We’re a certified dealer for Honda Engines and Honda Power Equipment so we can ship the OEM parts and accessories across the U.S. and Canada. Need help finding a part? Our site can show you factory parts diagrams and descriptions for your specific model so you know what you’re ordering will fit.

GX and GXV 690 Maintenance

GX and GXV 690 Maintenance

Honda makes quality engines, but it takes steady maintenance for them to live up to their reputation for reliability. Here’s what you need to know to keep your GX 690 or GXV 690 V-Twin in top running condition.

Maintenance Schedule

These maintenance tasks are easy enough that you can do them yourself:

Before each use – Check air filter and oil level.
After the first month or 20 hours of operation – Change the oil.
Every 6 months or 100 hours – Change the oil, clean the air filter and check the spark plug. Clean the spark arrester if your engine has one (GX 690 only.)
Every 200 hours – Replace the oil filter.
Every year or 300 hours – Replace the spark plug.
Every two years or 500 hours – Replace the paper air filter element.

Honda recommends having a small engine mechanic handle these maintenance tasks:

Every year or 300 hours – Check the idle speed and valve clearance, and replace the fuel filter
Every two years – Check the fuel tube and replace as needed
Every 1,000 hours: Clean the combustion chamber (GXV 690 only.)

Oil

This engine is designed to use oil that meets the requirements for API category SJ or later. Honda recommends oil viscosity based on the temperatures the engine will be operating in:

SAE 30 – 50-113ºF (10-45ºC)
Conventional 5W30 or 10W30 – 23-113ºF (-5-45ºC)
Synthetic 5W30 – 5-113ºF(-15-45ºC)

To get an accurate measurement when checking the oil, place the engine on a level surface and let it run for a couple minutes. This will splash some oil on the dipstick, so it needs to be cleaned and inserted all the way into the filler neck before checking the oil level. Some versions of this engine come equipped with Oil Alert, which will shut off the ignition automatically if the oil level is too low.

To change the oil, remove the drain plug, located directly below the starter on the GX 690 and next to the filler neck on the GXV 690. Once the oil has drained, reinstall the drain plug and a new sealing washer. If your engine is due for a new filter, remove the old one with an oil filter wrench. Using a strap wrench can damage the oil pressure switch. Coat the seal on the new filter with clean engine oil before installing. Screw in the filter by hand, then use the wrench to turn the filter another ¾ turn once the filter seats. Pour new oil into the oil filler neck, located on the top of the cylinder directly to the left of the dipstick. Add oil until the level comes up to the upper limit mark on the dipstick. Start the engine and check for leaks.

Air Filter

To access the filter, pull up on the latches at the sides of the air cleaner cover and pull the cover away from the engine. The paper filter and surrounding foam element can be removed by unscrewing the wing nut on the GX 690, while they can be lifted straight out of the air box on the GXV 690.

To clean the paper element, tap it on a hard surface or blow it out with compressed air. When using air, limit the pressure to 30 psi.

To clean the foam element, wash it in a non-flammable solvent or soapy water. Once the filter is dry, soak it in clean engine oil and squeeze it out to remove any excess.

Before reinstalling the filters, wipe out the inside of the air cleaner box.

Spark Plug

To remove the spark plugs, first, clean the area around the spark plug caps and disconnect them from the plugs. Use a 5/8 inch plug wrench to unscrew the plugs.

The spark plug gap should be between 0.028 and 0.031 inches (0.7-0.8 mm.) Replace the plug if it’s damaged, corroded, has a worn electrode or the sealing washer is in poor condition.

Always start the spark plug by hand to prevent cross-threading. Once seated, use the wrench to turn the plug another ½ turn if it’s new or 1/8-1/4 turn if it’s used to get a tight seal. Reconnect the spark plug caps.

Spark Arrester

If your engine has a round high-mount muffler, simply remove the screw from the tailpipe and slide out the arrester. If your engine has a flat side-mount muffler, you’ll need to remove the four bolts holding the muffler protector. With the muffler uncovered, remove the three screws holding in the arrester.

Use a wire brush to scrub off any carbon deposits. Replace the arrester if it has signs of damage.

Keep Your Engine Running with Quality OEM Parts

Hondalawnparts.com is a certified dealer for Honda Engines, letting us sell the parts you need to maintain your Honda engine no matter what it’s powering. Not sure what you need? Just pick your model and serial number, and our site can show you diagrams and descriptions to locate parts on your engine. We ship to any address in the United States or Canada.

Maintaining the WX15 Water Pump

Maintaining the WX15 Water Pump

Honda’s WX15 water pump may be small, but that doesn’t mean it’s disposable. By keeping up on maintenance, you can get the same reliable service you expect from the company’s full-size pumps.

Maintenance Schedule

Before each use – Check the air filter and engine oil level.
First month or 10 hours of operation – Change the engine oil.
Every three months or 25 hours – Clean the air filter.
Every 6 months or 50 hours – Change the engine oil.
Every year or 100 hours – Check the spark plug and clean the spark arrester (if equipped.)
Every two years or 300 hours – Replace the spark plug.

The air filter may need to be cleaned more often when operating in dusty areas. The engine oil should be changed every 25 hours if the pump is used under heavy loads or in high temperatures.

Honda recommends having the following maintenance be performed by a dealer:
Every year or 100 hours – Clean the fuel tank and filter, and check the idle speed, impeller and pump inlet valve.
Every two years or 300 hours – Check the engine valve clearance
Every 300 hours – Clean the combustion chamber

Fuel

When adding fuel, it should only come up to the fuel level mark, located at the base of the filler neck.

The engine can run on gasoline with up to 10% ethanol or 5% methanol. It’s important that this fuel is fresh: either use it within one month of purchase, or up to three months after purchase if it has been treated with a fuel stabilizer. If you will store your pump for longer or you use it sporadically, drain the fuel tank and carburetor before storing. To drain the carburetor, remove the drain bolt directly below the fuel valve, then turn the fuel valve to “ON.”

Oil

The engine powering this pump comes with Honda’s Oil Alert system. If the engine oil level is too low, it will shut off the engine to prevent internal damage.

To check the oil, remove the cap from the oil filler neck. Wipe off the attached dipstick, then put it back into the neck without screwing it in. To drain the oil, remove the drain plug directly below the filler neck. Be sure to install a new sealing washer before screwing the plug back into the crankcase.

This engine holds 8 oz. of oil. Honda recommends 10W30 motor oil for most operating conditions, while SAE 30 oil can be used between 50 and 104ºF. Always use oil that is SAE certified SJ or later.

Air Filter

To open the air cleaner box, push down on the two latch tabs on the top of the cover, then swing the cover out and down.

To clean the air filter, wash it in warm, soapy water or a nonflammable solvent. Gently squeeze the filter to remove the water or solvent, then let the filter dry. Dip the filter in clean engine oil, then squeeze it out. Never twist the filter: this can alter its shape, which can keep it from making a good seal inside the air cleaner box. Always wipe out the inside of the air cleaner before reinstalling the filter.

Spark Plug

To find the spark plug, look at the top of the fuel tank. The plug is directly below the round indent in the side of the tank.

To remove the plug, unhook the spark plug cap, then unscrew the plug with a 5/8 inch spark plug wrench. The gap between the electrodes should be between 0.024-0.028 inches (0.60-0.70 mm.) Replace the plug if the electrodes or insulator are damaged, or the plug has fouled.

When installing the spark plug, first thread it in by hand to prevent cross-threading. Use the plug wrench to tighten down the plug, turning an extra 1/8 turn once the plug is seated against the engine to get a good seal. If you’re installing a new plug, turn it an extra ¼-½ turn to form the washer to the plug and engine opening.

Spark Arrester

A spark arrester isn’t included from the factory, but it can be added to the muffler on any WX15 pump to meet local fire regulations.

To access the spark arrester, first, remove the muffler protector. It’s held on by three 5 mm bolts: two are located on the bottom of the cover, while the third is on the top right side. Remove the screw on the side of the exhaust outlet and slide out the arrester.

Clean any carbon buildup on the arrester screen with a wire brush. Replace the spark arrester if it has signs of holes, cracking or other damage.

Get the Parts You Need to Maintain Your Honda Pump

Hondalawnparts.com is a certified dealer for both Honda Engines and Honda Power Equipment. Our site has built-in factory information including parts diagrams and descriptions, making it easy to find what you’re looking for from hoses to spark plugs. We ship across the U.S. and Canada.

Maintaining WB20 and WB30 Water Pumps

Maintaining WB20 and WB30 Water Pumps

Want your WB20 or WB30 general purpose pump to provide years of trouble-free service? Here’s what you need to know to keep up on maintenance from using the right fuel to getting a good spark.

Maintenance Schedule

Each use: Check engine oil level and air cleaner
The first month or 20 hours of operation: Change oil
Every three months or 50 hours: Clean air filter
Every 6 months or 100 hours: Change oil, check the spark plug, clean sediment cup and, if equipped, spark arrester.
Every year or 300 hours: Replace the spark plug.

Honda recommends having this pump professionally serviced every 6 months or 100 hours to clean the combustion chamber, fuel tank, and filter, and every year or 300 hours to check the idle speed, valve clearance, impeller and pump inlet valve.

The WB20 and WB30 use different engines, but because they use the same basic design, maintenance is virtually identical.

Fuel

The engines in these pumps are designed to run on 86 Octane or higher with a maximum of 10% ethanol (E10) or 5% methanol. Use a stabilizer if fuel will be left in the tank for more than one month after purchase. Replace the fuel after three months.

When adding fuel, only fill to the bottom of the filler neck. The inch of air space left in the tank is needed to let the fuel expand when heated up during operation or storage. Make sure the vents in the cap are clean to let air enter the tank as fuel is drawn into the carburetor.

Oil

To get an accurate reading when checking the oil level, wipe off the dipstick and insert it into the filler neck without screwing it in.

Honda recommends oil with an API service category SJ or later. 10W30 will work under most conditions, and SAE 30 can be used at operating temperatures between 50 and 105ºF.

To drain the oil, remove the drain plug to the left of the oil filler neck. Use a new sealing washer when reinstalling the drain plug to ensure a tight, leak-free seal.

The engine in the WB20XT holds 0.59 quarts, while the engine in the WB30XT holds 0.61 quarts. When adding fresh oil, it should come up to the edge of the filler neck.

Air Filter

To open the air cleaner box, remove the wing nut on the top of the box followed by the cover washer and air cleaner cover. From there, the filter and grid can be lifted off of the carburetor.

If the air filter is dirty, clean it using a non-flammable solvent or water and a mild detergent. Once dry, soak the filter in clean engine oil and squeeze out any excess.

Sediment Cup

To clean the cup, set the fuel valve lever to “OFF.” Unscrew the sediment cup, located directly below the fuel switch, and remove the O-ring that sits between the cup and the carburetor.

Wash the cup in a non-flammable solvent. Place a new O-ring in the carburetor opening and reinstall the sediment cup. Open the fuel valve and check for leaks.

Spark Plug

Remove the spark plug cap and wipe away any dirt. The plug can be removed with a 13/16 inch spark plug wrench. The plug gap should be between 0.028 and 0.031 inches (0.7-0.8 mm.)

When installing the plug, screw it in by hand to prevent cross-threading, then tighten it down with the plug wrench. Once the plug seats, turn it another 1/8-1/4 turn if it’ s a used plug, or ½ turn if it’s a new plug.

Spark Arrester

These pumps don’t come with a spark arrester, but one can be added to meet local fire and safety regulations. Let the engine cool for at least a half hour before handling the muffler.

To access the arrester, first, remove the two 8mm nuts attaching the muffler to the engine. Remove the muffler.

Next, remove the four 5 mm screws from the muffler protector, then remove the protector from the muffler.

Remove the 4 mm screw from the muffler outlet. You can now slide out the spark arrester.

Clean off carbon deposits on the arrester with a wire brush. If there are cracks or holes in the arrester, it needs to be replaced. Reassemble in reverse order.

Get the Parts You Need for Your Honda Water Pump

Hondalawnparts.com is a certified Honda Power Equipment and Honda Engines dealer. From hoses to spark arresters, if it’s Honda, we can ship an OEM replacement to your door whether you live in the U.S. or Canada. Need help finding a part? Browse our water pump accessory section or select your model using our search engine to see Honda factory diagrams and pick what you need.

Which Type of Water Pump is Right for You?

Which Type of Water Pump is Right for You?If you need a pump, Honda probably makes something to fit your needs. Which type of water pump is right for you? It depends on where the pump is used and the type of water that needs to be moved. Here’s what you need to consider when choosing a pump.

Types of Pumps

Honda makes pumps in four general categories, each with a specific purpose in mind.

De-watering: These pumps are built to handle clean water with debris up to 3/8 of an inch in diameter, which is the size of a marble. Models include the lightweight WX, general purpose WB and high-pressure WH.

General purpose: The WMP20 is the only Honda pump approved for industrial and agricultural chemicals. It comes with a housing and seals designed for chemical resistance, but it can also be used to pump water.

Construction: These pumps are built for high volume applications and water with high solids content. WT trash pumps are basically beefed-up de-watering pumps, capable of handling solids up to two inches in diameter. That’s between the size of a golf ball and a billiard ball. The WDP diaphragm pump is built for severe conditions. It can pump water with up to 25% debris content and with solids up to 2.4 inches in diameter, and it won’t overheat if run dry.

Submersible pumps: These electric pumps are perfect for fixed locations. They’re fitted with float switches, activating the pump when the surrounding area starts to flood. The WSP50 and WSP100 are trash pumps, while the other models are de-watering pumps.

Choosing a Pump for Removing Water

To match the pump to your application, you need to consider both the amount and size of debris in the water. These are general guidelines for common applications:

Clear, silt and slimy water – All pumps
Muck water – All models except WSP submersible
Slow seepage – WDP diaphragm pump
Fast seepage – All models
Manholes and cofferdams – All models except for WX lightweight de-watering pumps
Quarries: WH high-pressure de-watering pumps, WMP multi-purpose, WT trash and WSP submersible
High solid content: WT and WDP construction pumps or WSP50 and WSP100 submersible trash pumps
Deep piling: WSP submersible pumps
Industrial and agricultural chemicals: WMP multi-purpose pump

Choosing a Pump to Supply Water

Water used to supply equipment is usually clean or almost clean, so the main consideration is flow rate. These are general guidelines for common equipment and applications:

Mixers, pavers, concrete curing and non-potable water wagons – WB general purpose de-watering, WMP multi-purpose and WT trash pumps
Sprinklers and nozzles – WH high-pressure de-watering pumps
Fountains and garden irrigation – WSP submersible pumps

Head and Flow Rate

Head is the vertical distance the pump can move water. This is divided into suction head, the maximum height at the end of the intake hose and the intake of the pump, and discharge head, the height between the discharge port and the end of the discharge hose. Submersible pumps draw water in from the bottom of the pump housing, so they only have a discharge head.

Quoted flow rates and head are under ideal conditions. The actual flow rate will decrease as head increases, and both head and flow rate will decrease as hose length increases. The suction head is controlled by surrounding air pressure: quoted lift is at sea level, while real world lift will decrease by about a foot for every 500 feet of elevation. Chemicals and trash-filled water can be heavier than clean water, which further decreases pump rates.

To take the confusion out of selecting a pump, Honda offers a free program called “Pump Select.” Once you give the program information about your operating conditions, it can recommend a pump that will best fit your needs.

Getting the Parts and Accessories You Need for Your Honda Pump

Hondalawnparts.com has more than just lawn equipment parts: we carry everything for Honda engines and power equipment, including pumps. We have a section dedicated to pump accessories so you can put together the hoses and filters you need for your application, or you can find OEM replacement parts by selecting your model and serial number. Our site has built-in factory parts diagrams and descriptions to help you find what you’re looking for. We ship across the U.S. and Canada.

Submersible Electric Water Pumps

Submersible Electric Water Pumps

Honda’s gas-powered pumps are great for temporary use, but what if you have a situation where you need to move water in a fixed area continuously? By using sealed electric motors, their submersible pumps can handle constant operation, making them perfect for jobs ranging from irrigation to flood cleanup.

Uses

These pumps are perfect for stationary applications where electric power is readily available. Unlike gas-powered pumps, these submersible pumps can be run constantly for days or even weeks at a time as long as they’re fully submerged. These models are commonly used for these applications:

– Pumping clear water to and from fountains and pools
– Draining flooded areas in enclosed spaces such as basements
– Garden irrigation
– Removing seepage in residential, commercial and industrial buildings
– Removing waste water from washing machines, water softeners, cisterns and dehumidifiers

These pumps are rated for continuous use when pumping water up to 104°F and can be used for intermittent use for pumping water up to 140°F. That’s high enough to handle almost any fresh water continuously and brief pumping of water direct from a household water heater. However, they are not rated to handle corrosive fluids like sea water.

Built with Honda Quality

It may not have one of the company’s famous engines, but these pumps are still built with the attention to detail that gives Honda products their reputation for reliability. This starts with a stainless steel case that will remain rust free where coated cases will eventually rust. It insulates the motor with a blanket of air, keeping everything cool when submerged in warm water. Oil lubricated mechanical seals prevent damage if the pump runs dry, and a float switch is included with every model to shut the pump off automatically once the area has been drained. The motor is further protected by a built-in thermal automatic reset to prevent overloading. The pump shaft rides on shielded ball bearings for hundreds of hours of maintenance-free service.

Models

Honda makes both water and trash pumps. Water pumps can handle solids up to 3/8 of an inch in diameter, and they have top-mounted discharge ports. Trash pumps can handle solids up to two inches in diameter and have side-mounted discharge ports.

Along with flow rates and solids capacity, there are two other factors that need to be taken into account when choosing a pump. Head is the maximum vertical distance the pump can move water. Since the intake is built into the bottom of the pump, this is the distance from the pump outlet to the top of the system. Power cable length also limits the placement of the pump. It’s built into the pump for a watertight seal, and due to high power demands, it should be plugged directly into an outlet.

Water Pumps

The WPS33 has a 1/3 hp motor that can move up to 40 gallons of water per minute. It has a maximum head of 23 feet, and it comes with a 20-foot power cable. The WSP53 uses a ½ hp motor, giving it a maximum flow rate of 70 GPM and a maximum head of 44 feet. It comes with a 50-foot power cable. The WSP73’s ¾ hp motor pumps water up to 54 feet high at a rate of 74 GPM. It comes with a 50-foot power cable.

Trash Pumps

The WSP50’s ½ horsepower motor pumps water at a rate of 110 GPM. It has a total head of 32 feet and comes with a 25-foot power cable. The WSP100’s one horsepower motor moves up to 150 GPM with a head of 42 feet. It comes with a 25-foot power cable.

What You Need to Use a Submersible Pump

Setting up a submersible pump is much simpler than setting up a gas-powered pump. The strainer is built into the base of the pump, while the discharge opening is designed for use with solid or flexible pipes with G2 pipe fittings. A no-return valve should be built into the pipe system. A heavy cable or rope should be tied to the handle of the pump to lower it into the water and raise it back up. The plug is designed to use with three prong grounded sockets.

Getting Parts for Your Water Pump

www.hondalawnparts.com is a certified dealer for Honda Power Equipment, letting us offer OEM parts for everything Honda makes from gas-powered diaphragm pumps to electric submersible pumps. Whether you need a strainer or a float switch, we can ship your order to any address in the U.S. or Canada.